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that spending. president obama and liberal allies don't seem very concerned. and that, in my opinion, is dangerous. on the social front the latest stats available show there were 1,200,000 abortions performed in the u.s.a. in 2008. that means more than a million americans will never be born. should the country be proud of that? yet, we see wild applause when proabortion zealots speak at the democratic convention, for example. exactly what are they applauding that more than a million potential human beings are dead? drug front panoply that drug use will be legal in the u.s.a. close to 30 million americans are addicted to something. yet, some people are happy, happy that, yet, another indocks can't will soon be widely available. does that make any sense to you? as far as children are concerned they can see the lowest forms of depravity on the internet. yet public schools are mandated to virtually ignore religion. let's recap, enormous amount of entitlement spending drive the nation into bankruptcy. judeo religion philosophy deemphasized in schools. abortion and drugs more widely availa
not -- >> bob: how do you go to work with the flu? >> andrea: here is the thing. i don't like flu shots either. i got one ten years ago and i got the flu so bad for two weeks. it already got it this year -- i already got it this year. >> eric: there will r a lot of -- put hit the way. interesting information out there you may or may not know we will throw around a few questions to the table. answer some of the questions. question number one. in normal flu season how many americans will be infected? >> dana: 226,000. >> kimberly: you saw the card. you always do that. >> eric: i can't see so i go like this. >> kimberly: she knew we were going to have a quiz. >> andrea: totally. >> dana: i read it on the thing. >> eric: on average, 226,000. how many hospitalizations? there are between 3,000 and 49,000 deaths occur each year. >> kimberly: scary. >> eric: move to question number two. can you contagious before, during or after you experience symptoms of the flu? >> andrea: all three. >> during. >> kimberly: before. >> dana: before. >> eric: all of them. the answer is most healthy adults according to
a bunch of democrats saying we don't want any spending cuts, entitlement cuts, nothing. just pass the debt ceiling. no spending. >> do whatever it takes. apparently the hurdle is some legality. not whether it's a good idea, not whether it calls into question the independence of the central bank, the independence of whether the treasury will now have the new power to print money whatever it has. as long as it's legal. let me tell you. of all these options, the magic coin option, the 14th amendment may be the worst option. it will be challenged in court. the court moves forward. you end up with two classes of u.s. debt, one which people have a lot of confidence in, then this different class of debt which was created under this who knows what new legal authority that they found. >> this is the point. let me go right. the i.o.u. this is interesting. edward klinebard, former chief of staff at the congressional joint committee on taxation is now teaching law at the university of southern california. now, he says that congress has constitutional authority to raise the debt and only the congress.
became iconic in this basket catch. where did that come from? they don't teach that today. >> no, they won't let them do that today. i said to myself, what can i do to make the game that people enjoy when they come to see me play. i started to do something different. i started making the basket catchish and i found out i could get rid of the ball quicker with the basket catch than over my hand. i started doing that, when i went out they said i could do that. >> gavin: but you did famously a line drive. >> i missed two balls. ten years apart. one in pittsburgh. that's the only one i missed. he said go ahead and do it. no problem. >> gavin: did others try to emulate them, did others try to copy you. >> clamene. he did it pretty good. he saw me do that. but he could throw. >> gavin: what makes a great defensive player. is it the arm? leg, speed anticipating where the ball is, understanding conditions keeping a mental focus. >> i think it's more organizing. knowing what the hitter is going to do before he hits. i could go home at night, which i did if we were going to play a new team
is performing and has put the whale behind him. that said, i don't want you to buy it or any of the banks ahead. it's too hard. especially after wells fargo dropped today. even though it reported a pretty darn good quarter. we get results from ebay. the longest time i have stood behind ebay, but my charitable trust recently sold it after a huge run-up. it kept going higher. this stock, though, did get hammered the last time it reported because the market failed to recognize the inherent value of pay pal. the on-line credit card company buried within ebay. be ready to buy if this this happens again. my trust might be there with you. next up, kinder morgan energy partners, kmp. the partnerships finished 2012 terribly, in part because the people were worried that the tax breaks they enjoyed would be erased by the fiscal cliff. buyers are still skittish because they remain under a cloud, a cloud of low natural gas, the possibility of the debt ceiling negotiations might include new revenue raised by taxing them. you know what, that's the same old-same old. i don't care about it. i like kinder morgan
laden was shot in the head. should we release them? i don't know. >> obama: photos of someone being shot in the head floating around. >> cenk: let 'em go, let 'em go. and historic as usual, global warming all over the united states and now it's costing business in mississippi. and then we have a person who is an activist for the dream act and then all of a sudden her mother gets picked up by the authorities. get a look at this reaction. [ sobbing ] >> cenk: she's going to be on the show today. and then finally here we go again, another republican talking about legitimate rape. >> it is true. we tell couples all the time who are having trouble consuming because of the woman not ovulating, just relax. >> cenk: now wait until you find out the number of women who get pregnant because of rape in america. it's a stunning number. this is a stunning show. go time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: all right we got some good news about afghanistan, and the good news is we're leaving. president obama met with hamid karzai, the leader of afghanistan. >> the forces i have ordered to afghanistan have served
kid. great school. don't forget the rollins pub is fantastic on the golf course. >> kimberly: throw bolling's name. >> eric: all you need. >> dana: not in class. that is it for "the five." >> eric: a big weekend in football. championship weekend. >> dana: go broncos. >> bret: go >>> everyone has the flu. welcome to "red eye." i'm tom shillou filling in for greg gutfeld who is siping sis sippie cup of nyquil. look at that cd. let's go to tv's andy levy for our pre game report. andy, what is coming up on tonight's show? >> is the white house considering funding for police in public schools? i hope so. and are you ready for tv's who know who is watching them? and finally is beyonce totally cray? the answer is yea. that is y-e-a and not y-a-y. you guys dust me. >> what? >> sorry, that was for greg. >> i was wondering why my prompter said go away, andy. >> forget it. >> i met her back when i was a hotshot young surgeon headed to l.a. my car broke down in rural south carolina where she used to swim naked in the county lake. i am here with author and columnist jedediah bila. and i met him
the wrong thing in america. we subsidize foots that are not good for us. i don't mind having a bun here and there, but with empty calories for the main food fly, our brains are smart. they are looking for nutrients, not calories. if you eat french fries by themselves, they are the single worst food. the average person eating french fries will gain about three poundins a year. a baked potato is fine when the add the sugar and salt and fry them down, our body can't deal with that. you gave me calories, but no nutrients. >> when i came to america, i was struck by two things. one, incredible amount of fast food that you americans guzzle. secondly, the amazing portions that come with almost every meal. you cannot order breakfast without somebody in a restaurant shoveling on potato or fries without anybody asking for it. you just shovel out the food. >> one of the realities -- >> i mean that in a nice way. >> we got comfortable making those portions part of what we do. this is looked at. you move the place size and we have 11 inch plates. that's a lot more food than a nine or seven-inch plate
another. it is almost as if they don't care how brazenly sound -- funny face down and disingenuous they are.e hear from citi and bank of america. melissa: i'm melissa francis and here's what's "money" tonight. well you probably heard about shell's grounded alaskan oil rig but did you know why it might have been moved, to avoid taxes. we'll drill down on those details. plus ditching the gas tax by the side of the road. virginia governor bob mcdonnell, wants his state's 17.5 cents gas tax gone for good but he wants to raise another tax instead. he will join us in a fox business exclusive to tell us how it all shakes out. >>> a landmark decision in the sports world. major league baseball will start random in season testing for steroids. will the help its tarnished image and bring in ticket sales? we have former cincinnati reds pitcher, rob dib bill. even what they say it is not it is always about money. melissa: all right. first let's take a look at the day's market headlines. stocks reversed early losses capping off the week with modest gains. the dow gained 17 points to close at its
if he did a book called killing unicorns. i get the unicorns. they don't. by the way, i don't know how many people are fans of red eye? [cheers and applause] all right. this whole unicorn got out of hand. [laughter] the reason why i was talking about unicorns in the beginning of the show is i thought it would be odd and weird if a middle-aged man was obsessed with something a teenage girl would be. i thought as a conservative libertarian, it would be interesting to create false narratives about you to throw off the left. if you assign certain behaviors to yourself, they don't know what to make of you. i learned this at the huffington post that i created this whole false story behind me, that i lived with a flight instructor named scott. [laughter] he was never home. [laughter] and there would always been a weird stimpleg in the basement, and i wrote this stuff because the left was not used to dealing with somebody who was messing with them. in the world of left and right, the right was always what i call the dean warner from animal house. they delighted in that. my goal in life is to s
with what charles said. these people are inherently as a group corrupt. i don't think that's fair. if you want to say they're not doing their jobs well, not making the tough political decisions, that's different from correct. and dagen hit the nail on the head. we support them in these things. we don't want them to cut these programs. we, the people. that's the political problem. >> although, adam, in the election process, we are-- they do make several promises to do the right thing. and when they go there, whether they are he' pressu're us, they don't do the right thing and hence the corruption. >> maybe my definition of corrupt-- that doesn't describe law breaking, things punishable by going to prison so he we may be talking past each other on this. it's difficult to define, charles, what the right thing is. >> the right thing, the right thing? >> should they cut medicare? >> are you serious? we've got-- yes, cut it all. cut it all. i think ben stein, the courage, the political courage to do the right thing. we all know the right thing. >> the american people don't want these programs c
ground . the states experiment with things that mig do better. >> there are 9 states who don't have a personal income tax. you compare the state of vermont with the state of new hampshire. new hampshire has no sales tax or personal income tax and does better over time than the neighboring state of vermont that is a so-called progressive state. on a national level change the constitution or we will end up with a income and a consumption tax. >> unfortunately the constitution was changed in order to bring in the income tax. >> you have to change or we would get the both. >> you are against the idea of bobby gindale. >> i don't like sales tax. we saw the experiment in europe with that. they are onerous often than income tax . they are sneaky, too. it is vast and they are put in every element of sales and you don't know what the true tax rate and the cost. gin dale's program is to replace one source of government to do with another. it doesn't reduce what john and i would like to reduce the flow of money to the government. >> milton freeman didn't like national sales tax because it is t
of live television before. usually, it is people in the background that don't realize they are live on the air. the young journalist in florida realizes the camera is on her. >> registration is open until friday. the uaa will notify the winners by monday, december 15g9 and vouchers can then be picked up from tuesday through thursday. now, students with more than 90 credit hours have the best chance of getting tickets. everyone is welcome to sign up. live from the "newsroom," kara minelli, wuft news >>> then, we have picking your stories carefully. >> it is important you try to pick the bed bugs out of your home. when you stay in a hotel, you might want to us. >> a plastic bag like this one. >> just keep on picking. >> for those, people in the background, the news anchor himself or herself should always be aware of the camera. >> what? >> what? >> that hurts. >> a gentle reminder to all of us in the news business. when the light goes on, you are live on the air and the light is always on on "the ridicu list." >> erin brunette, out front next >>> is president obama calling the shots o
that doesn't work and people don't like to work together. we tried an experiment and so far so good. hey say. >> host: why did it work for so long? >> guest: we think it worked because a similarity of work ethics. we both love to research and report. we love to research and report and we were of sound mind and it makes for a sound mind that is hard for all of us but it was similar work habits, we believed down deep in fairness, government, private interest, not always treat the average person fairly and we sort of realize that early on in the partnership and one way or another, writing about that ever since. >> host: donald bartlett was your first project for the philadelphia inquirer? >> federal housing administration, and it was a fascinating project that dragged on for two years. >> guest: they thought they were going to put together for three months and we wrote some articles after three months and these in turn generated tremendous response. poor people were being sold defective houses and the federal government was insuring them and they would collapse after a month or two at the same
before, but people in the background who don't realize they are live on the air. the young journalist who is waiting at the printer who she real eyes the camera is on her. >> students can register tomorrow and registration is open until friday. they will notify the winners by monday december 15th and vouchers can then be picked up thursday through thursday. students with more than 90 hours have the best chance of getting tickets. everyone is welcome to sib up. live from the newsroom, wuft news. >> then the old adage of picking your stories carefully. >> it is important that you keep the bed bugs out of your home the best way. you might want to use a plastic bag like this one. >> just keep on picking. >> those are people in the background. the news anchor himself or herself must be aware of the camera. what? >> what? >> what? that hurts. a gentle reminder to all of us, when the light goes on, you are live on the air and the >>> "outfront" next, when it comes to america's troops, is president obama calling the shots, or is hamid karzai? >>> plus, losing steam and almost out o
that aren't good. grains. i don't mind having a bun. that tricks our brain but not in the right way. our brain is really smart. they're looking for nutrients, not calories. if you eat empty calories, soft drink, french fries. french fries are the single worst food. the average person eating french fries will gain three pounds a year. >> just from french fries? >> just from french fries. baked potato, that's fine. when you add sugar or salt and you fry them down, our body can't deal with that. our body says, you gave me calories but no nutrients. >> i was struck come being from europe by two things. one, incredible amount of fast food that you americans guzzle and secondly the amazing portions that come with almost every meal. you cannot order breakfast in america without somebody in a restaurant shoveling on potatoes, fries, without anybody asking for it. you just shovel out the food. >> we're all beginning to -- >> i mean that in a nice way. >> right. we've gotten very comfortable making those portions part of what we do. this has been looked at. you move the plate size to large which w
the opportunity. now, again, back to the politics. being a heavily kurdish region, they don't have the greatest relationship with istanbul, they don't have the greatest relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipli
want the factor word book. don't be a poltroon when writing to the factor. and i'm bill o'reilly, please remember that the spin stops right here because we are definitely looking out for you. >> welcome to "hannity" and right behind me sitting in our audience tonight are law abiding new york gun owners. now, their names and addresses were printed by a local new york news, simply because they are legal owners of firearms. thanks to the publisher, the families of the people behind me sitting in our audience have not been at risk and privacy trampled on and tonight they're here to voice their frustrations and fears. we're going to examine what legal action they can take against the blatant invasion of privacy and thanks to all of you for being here. how are you all doing tonight? let me start with a quick show of hands from everybody here, you've all been outed and how many here have been outed, almost everybody, right? you have not and you three, so i want to make sure who has that -- how many of you feel angry about what has happened here? everybody. how many of you feel y
>> listen to what happened. they asked us -- the folks at "good housekeeping" said why don't you come into our studio labs where we test everything, skin and what not, and we're going to do this segment called seven years younger. >> "good housekeeping" institute. >> they put us in hyperbaric chambers. they took close-up pictures of our face to check for wrinkles. don't say anything. pores. >> >> i prefer you with the hair. >> pores, et cetera. they took photos of us, and then they got inside and looked at our problem with dark spots and wrinkles and pores and everything. >> some of us had those problems. >> don't reveal, because it was the most depressing day. >> for someone. >> i wish that i didn't even go. we're going to do an entire segment describing not, again, with the photo, but describing what happened and how we can correct such problems. i can't believe. i got to tell you. they compare us to people in our own age group. >> that's where it really got ugly. >> with our own skin types. >> i am so in a funk after that. >> i actually think you ended up doing quite well. i'm
there is no single answer. and quite frankly, we don't even know whether some of the things people think impact on this actually impact on it or not. and so i want you to know you have not been, quote, singled out for help. >> over the past two weeks, the vice president's team has met with dozens of organizations and groups from around the country from a wide range of interests. the law enforcement community, the medical community, the child advocacy at risk youth groups have been involved, domestic violence and prevention community was in there, also legal justice and service organizations, religious groups and organization, education leaders, the mental health community, gun owners and sportsmen were included, gun safety advocates, technology experts. the vice president is taking recommendations from all groups. there is common ground on this issue from all sides. for instance, even nra members overwhelmingly support changes to background check laws. 74% want everyone purchasing a gun permit to undergo a background check with no loopholes. this is from republicans pollster frank luntz, and wa
and originally built as a single family and i don't see any reason why we should deny this. it makes a lot of sense. if project sponsor wanted to go up and add an additional floor and maybe change the configuration of the garage in the front and make it less of a visual garage coming in, but this is making a huge project out of something he just merely wants to combine the two units as they were originally configured, so i would suggest we do not take dr and approve the project. >> is that a motion? >> that's a motion. >> second. >> >> commissioner moore. >> i have been looking for the unit sizes, what they are now and what they would be when they're merged. the other thing i would like to ask, and that is a question for mr. crawford why isn't there a architect or engineer on the drawings which is typical for submittals? >> i believe mr. kaplan is the architect on this project. his name is on the application and on the plans. >> didn't he say he's not an architect. >> that's what he said. >> so there is no name of an architect or an engineer on this drawing. >> i will let mr. kaplan spe
is gone now, please don't look that up. how would it work? >> in theory the treasury would mint the coin and walk it over the federal reserve for deposit so the government could pay it bills. >> jon: really? really mr. tibbl snerks. [ laughter ] i don't want to bust your bibbles here, but you know you are only holding a quarter, snriet sure they could mint a trillion dollar coin and walk it over the treasury even though it could be the most tempting walk in history because we know the store across the street is chocolate, blowjobs and beyond. you definitely want to -- [ laughter ] you know, we don't need some trillion dollar coin gimmick. we need to take the u.s. dollar serious again. >> president obama will nominate his chief of staff at the white house jack lew toll bet next -- to be the next treasury secretary. >> it will be his signature at the bottom of our currency. it will look something like this. [ laughter ] >> jon: that injure signature? or jut -- that is your significant in signature or are you testing to see if the pen works? [ laughter ] hey, lew, shire -- here is a tip, st
're trying to do is make sure that women who metabolize the medication slower than men don't take the medicine and get up in the morning and go get in a car. it's not uncommon to do this, but the recommendations are coming out now, many of the people practicing clinically have known this for years. >> if we do metabolize slower than men, what are some of the side effects for women who have taken too much for their body weight. >> it's a great medicine to induce sleep, but not a great medicine at keeping you at sleep. the general recommendations are that you take it for a two to six-week period. you really want to modify the behavior whatever is causing the insomnia, probably the first line of therapy. and you're using it to simply assist people in getting rest until you get to the bottom of what the real cause of their insomnia is. >> and from what i understand, part of this drug is that people who take it may not even know that they're drowsy. have you actually encountered patients with this type of problem and other problems related to ambien? >> it's a very common drug, a great
don't know if you can see it in the details here but the original shows the measurement of 39 feet 11-inches and the new one, showses a measurement of they have feet however the measurement of 37 feet is here. and so it's 37 feet 9-inch and is so it's only a 3 feet reduction and 9-inches matters and i'm frustrated that they told us 3 feet and their own plan shows that it's not and furthermore the top floor is increased in length and the superficial appearance of shrinkage and it looks like it got a little smaller and bring up -- let's see here we go i'll show the ordinary care first and then you new and so they pushed the building out further over the sidewalk and pushed it back ask so the top increased a little bit and the bottom increased by 6 feet really significant and they left it for me to discover and so after looking at this proposals that their treating ancompromise that i brog good f to them. >>> in which way did it increase towards the back or the personal property. >> the top story was increased towards the back. >>> and then anything on the bottom? >> on the bo
, avoid touching your face and keep your germs to yourself f. you're sick, don't go to work and don't left the kids go to school. back to you. >> rick: anna kooiman, thank you so much. >> arthel: if that's not enough, there are new concerns we will simply run out of the flu vaccine. the largest producer of the vaccine in the united states says it sold out in four of the six different dosages it makes, mostly due to high demand. and companies also reporting a shortage of the liquid form of tamiflu, used to slow or stop the symptoms of the flu. that drug can only be taken in the very first few days of flu-like symptoms. manufacturers warned of an imminent delay in shipments. >> rick: switching gears, vice president joe biden preparing to make his recommendations to the president on ways to curb gun violence in this country. the vp met with the national rifle association, the entertainment industry, speculation grows over just what his task force will propose on tuesday. peter doocy with more from washington. >> the vice president gave us a very specific example on friday of an idea being kic
, what they think they know because someone told them what they don't know what all. the other difficulty about writing about the recent past is that it's not always easy to establish the past. the past that is so close to us. and yet, this is. to take apart, or commonsense view of the recent past and to interrogate what we think we know. to demystify a comedy mythologize, to move beyond the clichÉ about winners and losers and saints and sinners and the wisdom and encourage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians. grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of anti-fun house mirror. which, if i looked at it long enough, would reflect back to me often a hazy and indistinct, distorted forms, images of the things and people and places which organized and arranged and told the story of 20th century america. i was a colleague of arthur's lessons are in the city of new york. i had used a treasure trove of material is that jean kennedy smith's daughter, who is writing letters from her father to her aunt and uncles, and i
you so much for joining us, i'm don lemon in the cnn "newsroom." fr france's military is carrying out operations in africa. more than 100 people have been killed by french air strikes in northern mal i. france came to the aid of government in its fight. mean time in somalia, two french soldiers were killed in an attempt to free a french intelligence agent who may also have died in the raid. >>> syrian activists say government air forces are back in action, and pounding the outskirts of damascus. a week of bad weather grounded most planes. the rebels are claiming victory in the fight for an air base in the north. fighters say they seized weapons and ammunition after the battle. activists say 108 people were killed today in the civil war. >>> internet trail blazer aaron schwartz has passed away. a relative says schwartz committed suicide. he was only 26 years old. schwartz was involved with developing reddit and rss. later he dropped out of stanford university and focused on battling internet censorship. schwartz was facing legal trouble related to his activism and he had blogged about
just yet. dr. richard besser says many of us are in it for the long haul. >> we don't know when this is going to end. this could be the worst flu year in a decade. >> reporter: what makes this year's flu season so bad, timing. the outbreak hit around thanksgiving this year. that's about a month earlier than normal. we're six weeks in and with six more to go, doctors say it's not too late to get that flu shot. a recently-released study ranks this year's vaccine as 62% effective, just moderate. more than 130 million vaccine doses have been distributed nationwide. but many people are having trouble finding them in their neighborhoods. >> we are being told we don't have any. >> you don't have any left? okay. >> reporter: how do you know if you're coming down with the flu or just the common cold? >> if you think about a cold, it usually infects you from the neck-up. congestion, sinus, fullness, sore throat. the flu, you're going to feel achy all over. >> reporter: if you can't find the flu vaccine at your local pharmacy, head over to flu.gov. you can use their vaccine finder by punch
cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the stories of guantanamo and the business in afghanistan, maybe stories none of us have ever heard. he will be an embarrassment to the government if he is ever released. he is part of this situation where we reach
the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care providers, but recent research has found that women who are at high risk of breast cancer because of braque of mutation who then screening at earlier and earlier ages may be particularly vulnerable to radiation, so for them, alternatives to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state
to par. you also don't just want to just make some kind of announcement without thinking it through. i talked to a senior administration official who said to lead 10,000 troops in afghanistan could cost us $30 billion a year. the president also has to make an economic decision, as well. so, look, if panetta is saying i want it done in weeks and the president is simply saying i'm going to take a few more months, i say take your time because you're dealing with the lives of american troops. >> that's a fair point. of course, the time -- the clock is ticking, the united states says it's going to withdraw in 2014. it's knot just the delay on troop numbers that had us asking questions today. today the president gave a reason for the delay. said, look, i haven't given recommendations yet for general john allen. here's what the president said. >> i'm going to be over the coming weeks getting recommendations from general allen and other commanders on the ground. >> all right a month ago when i spoke with secretary panetta, he agreed general allen was the one responsible but said the options we
mean you moved out, so people don't live here anymore they are a little less close but not less close than that. >> maybe we need to work harder and make plans for just the two of us. >> well i was working and if i am not grumpy, i am writing and try calling you a lot last week. >> and i told you i have a third full-time job which is taking care of adam, i'm sorry. >> i am having a really hard time right now. >> i have no job, no boyfriend, i am starting to feel like i have no you. >> that is not true, okay? >> i am right here. >> okay. >> rose: the second season of girls begins this sunday, january 13, i am pleased to have lena dunham at the table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you so much for having me. it is very exciting, looking around at the studio, well, this is where the magic happens. >> rose: we hope. you create magic too, by the way. >> thank you so much. >> rose: how would you define what you do? >> i guess i would define what i do generally outside of girls as i write and direct film and television shows that that have strong female protagonists and are aimed at il
therapeutics. >> what are they. >> pills for people who don't take care of themselves. >> it is a volatile and it goes up and down faster than evil knevil on a motorcycle. it has a good balance with 10 percent and i like that. >> i like of the reference of evil knevil. thanks for watching. number one business block continues with cheryl casoney and cashin. >> bosses be wear. employees may get the green light to bash there arecompany on social media sights. the same law protects them and workers the workers and take on colleagues on twitter. some say it is about boosting big labor. are they right? i am cheryl casewn and welcome to cashin in . joining us this week marjorie christon and welcome to all of you. johnathon i will start with you. is this about protecting the workers or padding union numbers? >> it is shocking, cheryl. it is union-led government force that is tremendoly destructive to businesses. i mean, whose company is it anyway? the owners or the governments? of course, it is the owners and only the owner decides who works there. you have no right to a job let alone one that you
. you know, colorado is a big hunting state. and i don't think anyone that i have ever met that is a responsible gun owner can side with these, you know, for lack of a better word, these loony tunes who are out here because they're doing something different. they're stockpiling. they're getting assault rifles. these are not normal gun owners. what you're hearing from now is the absolute fringe, and, unfortunately, they're being allowed to speak for the pro-second amendment crowd. >> david, we're going to show the worst of the worst in a minute, but first your thoughts. will the regular gun owners, the people that are in the nra in pennsylvania and they vote, democrat or republican, are they going to go with the crazies like james yeager? we're going to show him and alex jones again. >> you know what's crucial to this is what clinton did back in '94. remember, he got an assault weapons ban through congress over the nra opposition and opposition to many republicans and some democrats, and the way he got it was by bringing the cops, the police -- >> but how many seats did he l
films. c-span: one question about teach for america. how big of an ego destroyer is that when they don't take you? how many young people try to become teach for america? >> guest: i couldn't believe it. i thought, i'm trying to help people and be a teacher and you get it, but it hurt. i wouldn't be sitting here if that hadn't happened. i ended up interviewing wendy kopp from teach for america for my first son, so it came full circle. c-span: go back to the project of going around the country. where did you go, how many people really do how much did it cost you? >> guest: in fall 2005 a data for three of of my best friends. it was really cheap. we were scrapping together money from family and friends. we get sponsorship money from nantucket nectar's and penske corp., but he was really bootstraps, rest guerrilla filmmaking. i'd never held a camera before, never taken a civil class before. it is just learning as we went. it is really an exhilarating experience. what an honor to go up to anyone across the country and get their story and speaks them about truth sendups of their lives. it wa
in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians" to be out in early 2013. this brings me tore most recent book, the one we are here to discuss with her. i have many questions to ask her, but before doing so, let me say a few general things
through all of that? >> i don't know. certainly it was in retrospect. i wouldn't have done it any different. i was willing to risk it. i'm a woman of a certain age and i thought, well, gosh, i don't want to do it in such a way that i'll drop dead halfway through production and they'll recast. i won't get to do it, you know after all of this. that's one of the reasons i went to a nutritionist and tried to do it healthy. but i found out it doesn't matter, field. it doesn't matter if you eat tons of tons of brown rice and you're eating this enormous amount of calories. it's still fat and, if it was gonna clog in my heart or my brain or wherever, i was gonna be dead, no matter what. tavis: i could be totally off base here, so i'm just asking you. you disabuse me of the notion if i'm wrong about this, but how much of wanting to be in a project like this i don't care if your name is sally field or whoever else in this town. is there a gravitational pull even to want to be in a project like this when you know even before it's done you don't know if it's gonna work or not but you know t
many times have you heard this -- "don't go outside with your hair wet. you'll catch a cold." do you think that's true? >> yeah, i do think it's the truth. >> yes. >> why? >> because your hair's wet, and it's cold outside. >> yes. >> why? >> because i've done that before, and i got a cold. >> yeah, my hair froze once when i was coming back from swim practice. >> if you go outside with wet hair, you are inviting a bad hair day, but you're not inviting a cold. >> scientists in england found that warning just doesn't hold water. >> that's just one of the health myths checked out by realsimple.com. here are some others. gum stays in your stomach for seven years. do you believe that one? >> yes. >> why? >> 'cause it's sticky. >> no, i think you digest it. >> file this one under myth. the experts say your digestive system does dissolve gum, though it might take a few days. but don't make a habit of swallowing it. eat an apple instead. after all, "an apple a day keeps... >> the doctor away. >> and not just apples. there are all kinds of fruits that are better for us than candy and cookies.
the budget. >> yes, he can. >> he's just going to spend. i'm sorry, doug, i don't want to disparage -- lori: all right, it's just getting interesting. sorry, we're out of time. thanks so much. and thank you for joining me. i'm lori rothman sitting in for lou dobbs tonight. catch me each day on now, 1 p.m. have a fantastic weekend, everybody. neil: let it be known this is the week the president tried to become a dictator. i know, i know, it sounds crazy, and, man, do i hope i'm wrong, but this is the week i discovered a president who sized up an opposition party that was very weak. this was the week that barack obama came in peace to rip our constitution to pieces. welcome, everybody, i'm neil cavuto, and i know, i know, i know what you're thinking, neil's lost. you might be right on that, but i know i'm not wrong, not one bit. now, again, i know that sounds mad, but a lot of folks are mad, very mad at a president increasingly willing to bypass congress and bypass something else, the constitution, to get what he wants whenever he wants it and get it fast. just read this week's i'll call 'em
to bypass congress, she is giving him the power to bypass her too. you don't need a trillion dollar magic coin to realize this is nothing less than a high stakes power grab. now, it's not unusual for presidents of either party to try. it is very unusual for so many in both parts to lay down and let him do it. all right, here to hash it out, constitutional expert ilya shapiro and sabrina schafer as well as "the wall street journal"'s steve moore. steve, a disturbing series of events, to put it mildly. >> no question about it, neil. and, look, we have a three-branch system of government in washington. the president is the chief of the executive branch, that means the president doesn't make the laws, he executes the laws that congress passes. and, you know, i'm in austin, texas, today. here in texas everybody's been talking about this. what is with all these executive orders? what gives the president the authority to do this? and the one that, you know, i'm most interested in, obviously, is whether the president will try to unilaterally raise the debt ceiling without approval of congress. an
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